Phone: (561) 299-0405 Email: info@farronline.org

Hep C Community Educators Reaching Out to the Recovery Community.

Hepatitis C Community Educators is now embarking on a program to reach out to recovery residences and treatment programs about the dangers of Hepatitis C and the treatment options patients who test positive may have.  Unfortunately, with a dramatic increase in intravenous drug use among younger populations, as well as the high prevalence of the disease among what many refer to as the ‘baby boomer’ generation, Hepatitis C has become a major concern among the medical community nationwide.  The Hep C Community Educators are now partnering with FARR in order to reach out to the recovery community, with an emphasis on the education awareness and treatment of Hepatitis C.

 

The Hepatitis C Community Educators program is a support program of specially trained individuals who’s mission is to help “support people with hep C and help them find the education and resources they need.

This free service will help you:

-learn the facts about your conditions

-create a personal education plan about hep c

-prepare to speak with your doctor

-locate community programs”

 

To get the Hep C Community Educators involved in your community, recovery residence or treatment center, or if you or a loved one have any questions or concerns about the disease, please contact us at  1-844-428-4357 or visit www.HepCEducate.com

 

MYTHS AND FACTS ABOUT HEP C

MYTH: YOU CANNOT BE CURED OF HEP C.

Not only can patients with hepatitis C be treated, they can also be cured. “Cured” means that the hep C virus is not detectable in your blood months after treatment has ended. Relapse or reinfection is still possible and you can still have liver disease even after you have been cured, so stay in regular contact with your doctor.

Today, there are more treatment options than ever before. This gives your doctor the chance to choose the prescription drug combination that may be right for you. If you’ve been diagnosed with hep C, talk to your doctor about managing your condition and ask about your treatment options.

MYTH: THERE IS NO WAY TO REDUCE THE RISK OF GETTING HEP C.

There are ways to lessen your risk of getting the hep C virus. Some of these include:

  • Avoid sharing needles and injecting or snorting drugs
  • Don’t share razors, toothbrushes, nail clippers, or other personal care items that may have come into contact with infected blood
  • Don’t use tattoo or piercing equipment that’s been used on someone else
Did you know that hep C is the leading reason for liver transplants in the united States?

HEP C IS THE LEADING REASON FOR
LIVER TRANSPLANTS IN THE UNITED STATES.

FACT: YOU CAN GET HEP C WHEN YOU HAVE SEX.

Though it’s rare, you can get hep C through sexual contact. Research shows that the risk of getting hep C is higher among people who have multiple partners or partners infected with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), a sexually transmitted disease (STD). To reduce the risk of spreading hep C, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends using latex condoms. Condoms, when used properly, are one way to protect against STDs. Always remember to practice safer sex.

MYTH: YOU CAN GET HEP C FROM SHARING EATING UTENSILS.

Hep C is passed from person to person when an uninfected person’s blood comes in contact with infected blood. Hep C isn’t spread by sharing eating utensils, food or drinks, or from shaking or holding hands with someone who’s infected.

Did you know that in the United States, hep C is about three times more common than HIV

IN THE UNITED STATES, HEP C IS ABOUT
3X MORE COMMON THAN HIV.

FACT: HEP C CAN SURVIVE OUTSIDE THE BODY.

Hep C is rarely spread this way. The hep C virus can survive outside the body at room temperature. It can live on surfaces for several weeks. But if infected blood does get on a surface, it’s important to clean it up while wearing rubber gloves and using a mixture of 1 part bleach and 10 parts water.

If you have questions or need more information, use the search bar at the top of the page or speak with your doctor.

MYTH: HEP C IS CURABLE WITH HERBS LIKE MILK THISTLE.

Some US adults with hep C use milk thistle as a supplement to conventional medicine. However, the US Food and Drug Administration, which regulates the use of prescription drugs, hasn’t approved alternative medicine for the treatment of hep C. Talk to your doctor before starting any treatment, including over the counter or herbal products.

Did you know that the liver’s job is to run many functions in the body like giving you energy and processing what you eat

THE LIVER HAS MANY FUNCTIONS, LIKE HELPING TO GIVE YOU
ENERGY & PROCESSING WHAT YOU EAT.

MYTH: THERE IS NOTHING YOU CAN DO ABOUT CHRONIC HEP C.

If you have chronic hepatitis C, your doctor may suggest different options to help you manage it. If you have no symptoms, your doctor may recommend that you watch and wait before taking any further action. Your doctor may also suggest a biopsy or liver scan to help keep track of your condition. If your doctor advises treatment, you may start taking an antiviral prescription drug combination. Antiviral medicines can result in a cure, also known as sustained virologic response. And no matter what course of action your doctor recommends, you should always do your best to take care of your body and stay in good health.

MYTH: YOU CAN TELL IF PEOPLE HAVE HEP C BY LOOKING AT THEM.

Without testing, it’s not possible to know if someone has the disease. When people get hep C, there’s only a 20% to 30% chance they will develop symptoms. That’s why hep C is known as a “silent disease.” If symptoms develop, hep C may have progressed to cause liver damage, making it harder to treat. The earlier hep C is diagnosed, the better. Testing for hep C is available in doctors’ offices and testing centers.

Did you know that the liver is the largest organ in the body and an important one

THE LIVER IS THE LARGEST ORGAN IN THE
BODY AND VERY IMPORTANT TO YOUR HEALTH.

MYTH: HEP C IS HEP C. THERE ARE NO DIFFERENT TYPES.

There are 6 commonly known genotypes of the hep C virus. Your body’s response to treatment can vary depending on your genotype. Blood tests at your doctor’s office or a testing center can determine your genotype. You and your doctor can then decide on next steps.

 

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